Consumers' CHECKBOOK Logo
H. Pylori — Overview, Symptoms, Treatments, and Other Resources.
H. Pylori (also known as Helicobacter Pylori Infection)
Comprehensive Guides
Information on H. Pylori and Peptic Ulcer at the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse
Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria. Researchers believe that H. pylori is responsible for the majority of peptic ulcers. H. pylori infection is common in the United States. About 20 percent of people under 40 years old and half of those over 60 years have it. Most infected people, however, do not develop ulcers. Why H. pylori does not cause ulcers in every infected person is not known. Read more at the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, NIH.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found this resource helpful.



H. pylori infection information from the Mayo Clinic
Information on H. pylori infection at MayClinic.com.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



H. Pylori Information from the Helicobacter Foundation
Helicobacter pylori is a spiral shaped bacterium that lives in the stomach and duodenum (section of intestine just below stomach). It has a unique way of adapting in the harsh environment of the stomach. The inside of the stomach is bathed in about half a gallon of gastric juice every day. Gastric juice is composed of digestive enzymes and concentrated hydrochloric acid, which can readily tear apart the toughest food or microorganism. Bacteria, viruses, and yesterday's steak dinner are all consumed in this deadly bath of chemicals. It used to be thought that the stomach contained no bacteria and was actually sterile, but Helicobacter pylori changed that. Read more on Helicobacter Pylori at the Helicobacter Foundation.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



H. pylori infection: Essentials at Consumer Reports
What is it? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? How common is it? What will happen? Questions to ask. Key points about treatments at Consumer Reports.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.




Clinical Practice Guidelines
Evidence-based practice for point-of-care testing (POC) for H. pylori.
There appear to be tests available for sensitive and specific testing at POC for H. pylori, but as yet no studies have been done to determine whether such POCT would have favorable clinical outcomes. Because tests including stool antigen tests, and urea breath tests have proven comparable in overall detection of H. pylori at the POC, studies should be conducted to determine their utility in early detection and treatment of dyspepsia-associated H. pylori disease. See National Guideline Clearinghouse major recommendations.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Peptic ulcer disease.
GUIDELINE OBJECTIVE(S): To implement a cost effective strategy incorporating testing for and eradication of Helicobacter pylori in patients with suspected peptic ulcer disease ; To reduce ulcer recurrence and prevent the overuse of chronic anti-secretory medications in peptic ulcer disease patients. See National Guideline Clearinghouse major recommendations.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Modifications in endoscopic practice for the elderly.
For patients in any age group, endoscopy should be performed only when the results will influence clinical management or outcome. The indications for gastrointestinal endoscopy among the elderly are largely the same as those for adults, with some variation in the relative frequency based upon the development of age-related diseases such as cancer, gastrointestinal ischemia, and biliary tract disease. The same relative and absolute contraindications also pertain, without respect to age. Increased attention should be paid, however, to the risk engendered by age-related diseases, such as cardiac and pulmonary dysfunction. Significant risk may outweigh the acknowledged benefits of a procedure. See National Guideline Clearinghouse major recommendations.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.




Important Articles from Medical Journals
Abstract: Helicobacter pylori diagnostic tests in children.
The array of tests that can be used for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection is large, and it can be confusing to define which test to use particularly in children where results may not be comparable to those obtained in adult patients. Using PubMed, we reviewed the English literature from January 1999 to May 2009 to identify articles that determined sensitivity and specificity of H. pylori invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests in children. See Abstract at PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Detection of Helicobacter pylori using PCR in dental plaque of patients with and without gastritis.
Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) accounts for gastritis, peptic ulcer and is a probable cause of gastric cancer. Since its detection in the oral cavity, concerns have been raised about dental plaque as a reservoir for reinfection. The aim of this study was to detect the organism in the dental plaque and to determine the association, if any, between H. pylori gastritis and dental plaque contamination causing H.pylori. Full text available free through PubMed

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Helicobacter pylori infection and endocrine disorders. Is there a link?
Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is a leading world-wide infectious disease as it affects more than half of the world population and causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies. The infection elicits a chronic cellular inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa. However, the effects of this local inflammation may not be confined solely to the digestive tract....Full text available free through PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Association between Helicobacter pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease.
Epidemiologic data suggest a protective effect of Helicobacter pylori infection against the development of autoimmune disease. Laboratory data illustrate H. pylori's ability to induce immune tolerance and limit inflammatory responses. Numerous observational studies have investigated the association between H. pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our aim was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of this association. See Abstract at PubMed

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Empiric Quadruple vs. Triple Therapy for Primary Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection.
Recent treatment guidelines recommend two first-line therapies for Helicobacter pylori infection: proton pump inhibitor (PPI), bismuth, tetracycline, and metronidazole (quadruple therapy) or PPI, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin (triple therapy). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and tolerability of these regimens as first-line treatment of H. pylori. See Abstract at PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Cost-Effectiveness of a Potential Prophylactic Helicobacter pylori Vaccine in the United States.
Helicobacter pylori vaccines are under development to prevent infection. We quantified the cost-effectiveness of such a vaccine in the United States, using a dynamic transmission model. Methods. We compartmentalized the population by age, infection status, and clinical disease state and measured effectiveness in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). We simulated no intervention, vaccination of infants, and vaccination of school-age children. See Abstract at PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Coadaptation of Helicobacter pylori and humans: ancient history, modern implications.
Humans have been colonized by Helicobacter pylori for at least 50,000 years and probably throughout their evolution. H. pylori has adapted to humans, colonizing children and persisting throughout life. See Abstract at PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Helicobacter pylori test and treat versus proton pump inhibitor in initial management of dyspepsia in primary care.
OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori "test and treat" compared with empirical acid suppression in the initial management of patients with dyspepsia in primary care. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: 80 general practices in the United Kingdom. Full text available free at PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.




Looking for a Top-Rated Gastroenterologist or Primary Care Physician?
Consumers' Guide to Top Doctors finds the Doctors Rated Best by other Doctors
To find out who the top doctors are around the country, nonprofit Consumers' CHECKBOOK surveyed roughly 340,000 physicians to tell us which specialists they would want to care for a loved one. The Top Doctors database contains the names of over 23,000 doctors who were mentioned most often. Find top-rated doctors in the fifty largest metropolitan areas, in over thirty-five specialties, and more.
Helicobacter Pylori Bacterium
Wikimedia

Small Stomach Ulcer

Consumers' Guide to Top Doctors finds the Doctors Rated Best by other Doctors in over 30 specialties.

Search Top Doctors database of 23,000 top-rated physicians by Doctor's Name

Search Top Doctors database of 23,000 top-rated physicians by Specialty (over 35 different fields included)

Gastric Biopsy with Visible Helicobacter Pylori

Consumers' Guide to Hospitals
Which Hospital Should You Choose
(or Avoid)?
"What makes the Consumers' Guide to Hospitals so special? We've got 30 million answers to that question. That's how many hospital records Consumers' CHECKBOOK sifted through to calculate risk-adjusted death rates and adverse-outcome rates, and that's just part of the data used to rate the hospitals. The organization also sent out more than 280,000 questionnaires to physicians in 53 major metropolitan areas in the United States, asking them to rate their local hospitals; checked ratings of the hospitals by surveyed consumers; checked which hospitals were providing recommended tests and procedures for patients with specified medical problems; and more."
AARP The Magazine

Return to the Diseases & Treatments A-Z page

Please type in the letters below. We ask this to prevent automated programs and "bots" from rating resources.

CHECKBOOK Home      Privacy      Security      About      Contact Us         
Copyright 2014 Center for the Study of Services. All Rights Reserved.
CHECKBOOK is a trademark and service mark of the Center for the Study of Services and is registered with the US Patent and Trademark Office.