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Leukemia — Overview, Symptoms, Treatments, and Other Resources.
Leukemia (also known as AML, ALL, CLL, CML)
Comprehensive Guides
What you need to know about leukemia from the National Cancer Institute
This National Cancer Institute (NCI) booklet is about leukemia. Each year in the United States, more than 40,800 adults and 3,500 children learn they have this disease. Learning about medical care for leukemia can help you take an active part in making choices about your care. This booklet tells about: diagnosis, treatment options, supportive care you may need before, during, or after treatment, tests the doctor may give you during follow-up visits, taking part in research studies. View the booklet from the National Cancer Institute.

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Information on Adult Chronic Leukemia from the National Library of Medicine
Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. You can often control chronic leukemia, but it is hard to cure. Learn more at the National Library of Medicine.

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Information on Childhood Leukemia from the National Library of Medicine
Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. Acute leukemia is a fast growing type while chronic leukemia grows slowly. Children with leukemia usually have one of the acute types. Treatment often cures childhood leukemia. Learn more at the National Library of Medicine.

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Information on Adult Acute Leukemia from the National Library of Medicine
Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. Adult acute leukemia can often be cured. Learn more at the National Library of Medicine.

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Information on Hairy Cell Leukemia from the National Library of Medicine
Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a rare cancer of the blood. It affects B cells, a type of white blood cell (lymphocyte). Newer chemotherapy treatments have greatly improved the survival of patients with hairy cell leukemia. Most patients with hairy cell leukemia can expect to live 10 years or longer with the disease. Learn more at the National Library of Medicine.

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Fact Sheets, Tutorials, Interactive Tools, and other Interesting Information
Living with Leukemia - a brochure from MD Anderson Cancer Center
This booklet was written for you and your family. We hope it helps you to take an active role in your care. Your understanding of leukemia is important in helping you make treatment decisions and making the unknown less frightening. More at MD Anderson Cancer Clinic.

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Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer
Late effects are treatment-related health problems that appear months or years after treatment has ended. The risk of developing late effects is related to the type of cancer or type of treatment. Regular follow-up care is very important for survivors of childhood cancer. Learn more from the Dana Farber Institute.

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News Release: FDA Approves New Treatment for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Arzerra (ofatumumab) for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a slowly progressing cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Arzerra is approved for patients with CLL whose cancer is no longer being controlled by other forms of chemotherapy.

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Videos and Podcasts
Podcast Podcast: Emerging Therapies in Leukemia, Lymphoma & Myeloma
Emerging Therapies in Leukemia, Lymphoma & Myeloma June 16, 2009 This program featured Gail J. Roboz, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Director, Leukemia Program, Weill Medical College of Cornell University/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY and John P. Leonard, MD, Richard T. Silver Distinguished Professor of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Professor of Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Clinical Director, New York - Cornell Center for Lymphoma and Myeloma, New York, NY and Robert Z. Orlowski, MD, PhD, Director, Myeloma Section, Associate Professor, Departments of Lymphoma/Myeloma and Experimental Therapeutics, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. This program was supported in part by Celgene. Listen to the podcast at audioblog.com.

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Podcast Podcast: CML - What Every Newly Diagnosed Patient Needs to Know
This program featured Jorge Cortes, MD, Professor of Medicine, Chief, CML Section, Department of Leukemia, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. This program was sponsored by The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and was supported by a grant from Novartis Oncology.

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Podcast Podcast: Childhood Leukemia and Lymphoma: An Update
Childhood Leukemia and Lymphoma: An Update on Current and Emerging Therapies This program featured Sima Jeha, M.D., Director, Leukemia/Lymphoma Developmental Therapeutics, Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN. This program was sponsored by The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and was supported by a grant from The Jeff Gordon Foundation.

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Video Video: Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia
Learn about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) by viewing this video. ALL is a cancer of the stem cells in the bone marrow. It is the most common cancer in young children. Presented at the Medical University of South Carolina Video Library.

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Forums & Support Communities


Clinical Practice Guidelines
Recommendations for the management of BCR-ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia.
Evaluation at Diagnosis, Initial Management, Monitoring Patients on Imatinib, Imatinib Response and Failure. View the major recommendations from the National Guideline Clearinghouse.

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Guidelines on the management of acute myeloid leukemia in adults.
Diagnosis, Classification, Treatment. View the major recommendations from the National Guideline Clearinghouse.

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Guidelines on the diagnosis and management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
Diagnosis, Prognosis, Management, Complications. View the major recommendations from the National Guideline Clearinghouse.

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Important Articles from Medical Journals
Free Full Text: Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Without Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation
A clinical trial to test whether prophylactic cranial irradiation could be omitted in all children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

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Free Full Text: Deletion of IKZF1 and Prognosis in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
Despite best current therapy, up to 20% of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a relapse. Recent genomewide analyses have identified a high frequency of DNA copy-number abnormalities in ALL, but the prognostic implications of these abnormalities have not been defined. View the free full text at Pubmed.

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Free Full Text: Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective clinical trials. View the free full text online at Pubmed.
CONTEXT: The optimal treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) is uncertain. Current consensus, based on cytogenetic risk, recommends myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) for poor-risk but not for good-risk AML. Allogeneic SCT, autologous transplantation, and consolidation chemotherapy are considered of equivalent benefit for intermediate-risk AML. OBJECTIVE: To quantify relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival benefit of allogeneic SCT for AML in CR1 overall and also for good-, intermediate-, and poor-risk AML. View the free full text at Pubmed.

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Abstract: The B cell mutator AID promotes B lymphoid blast crisis and drug resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia.
Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is induced by BCR-ABL1 and can be effectively treated for many years with Imatinib until leukemia cells acquire drug resistance through BCR-ABL1 mutations and progress into fatal B lymphoid blast crisis (LBC). Despite its clinical significance, the mechanism of progression into LBC is unknown. Here, we show that LBC but not CML cells express the B cell-specific mutator enzyme AID. We demonstrate that AID expression in CML cells promotes overall genetic instability by hypermutation of tumor suppressor and DNA repair genes. Importantly, our data uncover a causative role of AID activity in the acquisition of BCR-ABL1 mutations leading to Imatinib resistance, thus providing a rationale for the rapid development of drug resistance and blast crisis progression. View the abstract at Pubmed.

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Abstract: ABC transporter A3 facilitates lysosomal sequestration of imatinib and modulates susceptibility of chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines to this drug.
Background: Inhibition of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase activity has evolved as a mainstay of therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. However, a fraction of leukemic cells persists under targeted therapy and can lead to disease progression on cessation of treatment. Conclusions: The intracellular ABC transporter A3 is expressed in chronic myeloid leukemia progenitor cells and may contribute to intrinsic imatinib resistance by facilitating lysosomal sequestration in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. View the abstract at Pubmed.

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Abstract: Gene expression classifiers for relapse-free survival and minimal residual disease improve risk classification and outcome prediction in pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
To determine if gene expression profiling could improve outcome prediction in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at high risk for relapse, we profiled pre-treatment leukemic cells in 207 uniformly-treated children with high-risk B-precursor ALL. View the abstract at Pubmed.

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Looking for a Top-Rated Oncologist, Hematologist, or Pathologist?
Consumers' Guide to Top Doctors finds the Doctors Rated Best by other Doctors
To find out who the top doctors are around the country, nonprofit Consumers' CHECKBOOK surveyed roughly 340,000 physicians to tell us which specialists they would want to care for a loved one. The Top Doctors database contains the names of over 23,000 doctors who were mentioned most often. Find top-rated doctors in the fifty largest metropolitan areas, in over thirty-five specialties, and more.
Source: Wikimedia

Source: NCI

Consumers' Guide to Top Doctors finds the Doctors Rated Best by other Doctors in over 30 specialties.

Search Top Doctors database of 23,000 top-rated physicians by Doctor's Name

Search Top Doctors database of 23,000 top-rated physicians by Specialty (over 35 different fields included)

Microscopic image of leukemia
Source: Wikimedia

Consumers' Guide to Hospitals
Which Hospital Should You Choose
(or Avoid)?
"What makes the Consumers' Guide to Hospitals so special? We've got 30 million answers to that question. That's how many hospital records Consumers' CHECKBOOK sifted through to calculate risk-adjusted death rates and adverse-outcome rates, and that's just part of the data used to rate the hospitals. The organization also sent out more than 280,000 questionnaires to physicians in 53 major metropolitan areas in the United States, asking them to rate their local hospitals; checked ratings of the hospitals by surveyed consumers; checked which hospitals were providing recommended tests and procedures for patients with specified medical problems; and more."
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