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Myasthenia Gravis — Overview, Symptoms, Treatments, and Other Resources.
Myasthenia Gravis
Comprehensive Guides
Information on Myasthenia Gravis from the National Library of Medicine (NIH)
Myasthenia gravis interferes with messages your nerves send to your muscles. Myasthenia gravis often affects muscles in your head. Common symptoms are trouble with eye and eyelid movement, facial expression and swallowing. If you have myasthenia gravis, it is important to follow your treatment plan. If you do, you can expect your life to be normal or close to it. Read more at the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

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Information on Myasthenia Gravis from the Mayo Clinic
MayoClinic.com myasthenia gravis information. Read more about this procedure at MayoClinic.com.

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Information on Myasthenia Gravis from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NIH)
Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune neuromuscular disease characterized by varying degrees of weakness of the skeletal (voluntary) muscles of the body. The hallmark of myasthenia gravis is muscle weakness that increases during periods of activity and improves after periods of rest. Read more at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health.

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Fact Sheets, Tutorials, Interactive Tools, and other Interesting Information
Interactive Tutorial: Myasthenia Gravis
Myasthenia gravis is a disease that affects the muscles, causing them to become weak. This patient education program will help you understand what myasthenia gravis is and how it can be treated. To learn more, take an interactive tutorial provided by National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

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Fact Sheet: Myasthenia Gravis
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is a chronic, autoimmune disease that causes muscle weakness and excessive muscle fatigue. It is uncommon, affecting about 15 in every 100,000 individuals in the UK. The disease can vary in severity and distribution of weakness between individuals, and in any one patient the symptoms fluctuate with relapses and remissions. MG can resolve spontaneously, but for most patients MG persists for life. Read the fact sheet, presented by the Muscular Dystrophy Campaign.

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Videos and Podcasts
Video Video: Myasthenia Gravis
Myasthenia gravis is often called the rag doll illness, because it causes muscle weaknesses, muscles that they can’t control without treatment. Watch the video, provided by the Myasthenia Gravis Association.

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Video Video: Myasthenia Gravis
The name ‘myasthenia’ means muscle weakness, and the name ‘gravis’ is used because in some people, it can be very severe. The name was first used many decades ago, before we understood the nature of the disease. I’m pleased to say that nowadays, treatment is very effective, and it is very unusual for patients to have severe forms of the disease. Watch the video, provided by the Myasthenia Gravis Association.

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Video Video: Myasthenia Gravis: Redefining the Limits
Kaitlin Jasmon has gone from being a college athlete to needing to rely on others for simple tasks. Katie will discuss how she is redefining her own limits and maintaining a positive outlook. Watch the video from the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of Illinois.

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Podcast Podcast: Myasthenia Gravis
The symptoms can range from barely noticeable to debilitating… even life-threatening. We’re talking with Dr. Brian Crum, a Mayo Clinic neurologist about a condition called myasthenia gravis. Listen to the podcast at the Mayo Clinic.

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Podcast Podcast: Myasthenia Gravis
In this Medically Speaking podcast, Dr. Neil Porter, a neurologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center, discusses the symptoms and treatments for myasthenia gravis. Years ago, the disease could be fatal when it began to affect breathing muscles, but newer therapies have helped. Sometimes people with myasthenia gravis will have surgery to remove their thymus gland, which is part of the immune system. Listen to the podcast at the University of Maryland Medical Center.

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Clinical Practice Guidelines
Guidelines for the treatment of autoimmune neuromuscular transmission disorders
After the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis (MG) is established, an acetylcholine esterase inhibitor should be introduced. Thymoma patients should have thymectomy (TE). Acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-antibody positive early-onset patients with generalized MG and insufficient response to pyridostigmine therapy should be considered for TE, ideally within 1 year of disease onset. See National Guideline Clearinghouse major recommendations.

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Thymectomy for autoimmune myasthenia gravis
For patients with nonthymomatous autoimmune myasthenia gravis, thymectomy is recommended as an option to increase the probability of remission or improvement. See National Guideline Clearinghouse major recommendations.

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The medical treatment of ocular myasthenia
Are Cholinesterase Inhibitors, Corticosteroids, or Other Immunosuppressive Agents Effective in Improving Visual Symptoms in Ocular Myasthenia? See National Guideline Clearinghouse major recommendations.

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Important Articles from Medical Journals
Autoimmune myasthenia gravis: emerging clinical and biological heterogeneity
In this Review, we provide current information about the epidemiology, immunopathogenesis, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and treatment of MG, including emerging therapeutic strategies. Full text available free through Pubmed.

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Thymectomy in myasthenia gravis
Current therapies in autoimmune MG aim to restore the available acetylcholine receptors deplete the autoantibodies or suppress the immune system. To achieve these goals, thymectomy is one of the options among different treatment strategies. The presumed role of the thymus in MG has provided theoretical justification for the procedure. Full text available free through Pubmed.

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Abstract: Treatment strategies for myasthenia gravis
Advances in the treatment of myasthenia gravis (MG) have reduced mortality rates due to the disease and improved patients' quality of life. Nowadays, attending neurologists can choose among different treatment strategies for MG patients. Abstract available from Pubmed.

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Abstract: Corticosteroids for myasthenia gravis
Limited evidence from randomised controlled trials suggests that corticosteroid treatment offers significant short-term benefit in myasthenia gravis compared with placebo. This supports the conclusions of observational studies and expert opinion. Limited evidence from randomised controlled trials does not show any difference in efficacy between corticosteroids and either azathioprine or intravenous immunoglobulin. Abstract available from Cochrane Reviews.

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Abstract: Plasma exchange for myasthenia gravis
Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease mediated by auto-antibodies directed against the nicotinic receptor for acetylcholine. Patients would be expected to benefit from plasma exchange. No adequate randomised controlled trials have been performed to determine whether plasma exchange improves the short- or long-term outcome for myasthenia gravis. However, many case series studies report short-term benefit from plasma exchange in myasthenia gravis, especially in myasthenic crisis. Further research is need to compare plasma exchange with alternative short-term treatments for myasthenic crisis and to determine the value of long-term plasma exchange for treating myasthenia gravis. Abstract available from Cochrane Reviews.

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Abstract: Immunosuppressive agents for myasthenia gravis
In generalised MG, limited evidence from small RCTs suggests that ciclosporin, as monotherapy or with corticosteroids, or cyclophosphamide with corticosteroids, significantly improve MG. Limited evidence from RCTs shows no significant benefit from azathioprine (as monotherapy or with steroids), mycophenolate mofetil (as monotherapy or with either corticosteroids or ciclosporin) or tacrolimus (with corticosteroids or plasma exchange). Bigger, better-designed, longer trials are needed. Abstract available from Cochrane Reviews.

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Source: UT Southwestern Medical Center Health Library

Myasthenia Gravis News
Source: Society for Neuroscience

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