Consumers' CHECKBOOK Logo
Pneumonia — Overview, Symptoms, Treatments, and Other Resources.
Pneumonia (also known as Bronchopneumonia)
Comprehensive Guides
Information on Pneumonia at the national Library of Medicine
Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lung, usually caused by an infection. Three common causes are bacteria, viruses and fungi. You can also get pneumonia by accidentally inhaling a liquid or chemical. People most at risk are older than 65 or younger than 2 years of age, or already have health problems. Read more at the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found this resource helpful.



Information on Pneumonia at Mayo Clinic
Information on pneumonia from MayoClinic.com

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found this resource helpful.



Pediatric Pneumonia Information at Childrens' Hospital Boston
Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by bacteria, viruses, or chemical irritants. It is a serious infection or inflammation in which the air sacs fill with pus and other liquid. Read more on pediatric pneumonia at Childrens' Hospital Boston.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Information on Pneumonia at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
An introduction to several kinds of pneumonia with drawings illustrating how pneumonia occurs as presented at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found this resource helpful.




Fact Sheets, Tutorials, Interactive Tools, and other Interesting Information
Quiz: How Much Do You Know About the Pneumonia Vaccine?
Pneumonia is a lung infection that can be fatal. It is more common in the elderly, infants, young children, and some people with chronic health problems. A vaccine offers protection against some forms of pneumonia. Find out more about pneumonia and the vaccine by taking this quiz at the Methodist Health System website.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Vitamin C for preventing and treating pneumonia
An evidence-based review at the Cochrane Collaboration.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.




Videos and Podcasts
Podcast Podcast: Preventing Pneumonia
In this podcast, Dr. Adam Cohen discusses how to prevent pneumonia in young children at the Centers for Disease Control.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Podcast Podcast: Fighting a Bad Bug
Dr. Pekka Nuorti discusses the effectiveness of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at the Centers for Disease Control.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Video Video: Pneumonia 3D
View the video at Healthline.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.




Clinical Practice Guidelines
Consensus guidelines on the management of community-acquired pneumonia in adults.
GUIDELINE OBJECTIVE(S): To update clinicians with regard to important advances and controversies in the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. TARGET POPULATION: Adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). See National Guideline Clearinghouse major recommendations.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Evidence-based care guideline for community acquired pneumonia in children 60 days through 17 years of age.
These guidelines are intended primarily for use in children 60 days through 17 years of age with signs, symptoms, or other findings suggesting a diagnosis of uncomplicated pneumonia acquired by exposure to organisms in the community. GUIDELINE OBJECTIVE(S): To improve the use and interpretation of clinical signs and symptoms; To improve the appropriate use of diagnostic testing; To improve the use of appropriate antibiotic therapy; To improve the rate of hospitalized patients who meet admission criteria. See National Guideline Clearinghouse major recommendations.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Guidelines for preventing health-care--associated pneumonia, 2003: recommendations of CDC and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee.
TARGET POPULATION: Patients at risk of pneumonia and other severe, acute lower respiratory tract infections in acute-care hospitals and in other health-care settings. GUIDELINE OBJECTIVE(S): To provide appropriate recommendations for reducing the incidence of pneumonia and other severe, acute lower respiratory tract infections in acute-care hospitals and in other health-care settings (e.g., ambulatory and long-term care institutions) and other facilities where health care is provided. See National Guideline Clearinghouse major recommendations.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.




Important Articles from Medical Journals
Abstract: Bacterial Coinfections in Lung Tissue Specimens from Fatal Cases of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) --- United States, May--August 2009
In previous influenza pandemics, studies of autopsy specimens have shown that most deaths attributed to influenza A virus infection occurred concurrently with bacterial pneumonia, but such evidence has been lacking for 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1). To help determine the role of bacterial coinfection in the current influenza pandemic, CDC examined postmortem lung specimens from patients with fatal cases of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) for bacterial causes of pneumonia. Full text available free through PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Severe respiratory disease concurrent with the circulation of H1N1 influenza.
BACKGROUND: In the spring of 2009, an outbreak of severe pneumonia was reported in conjunction with the concurrent isolation of a novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV), widely known as swine flu, in Mexico. Influenza A (H1N1) subtype viruses have rarely predominated since the 1957 pandemic. The analysis of epidemic pneumonia in the absence of routine diagnostic tests can provide information about risk factors for severe disease from this virus and prospects for its control. See Abstract at PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Proton-pump inhibitor use and the risk for community-acquired pneumonia.
BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between PPI use and CAP in adults followed in general practices in the United Kingdom. See Abstract at PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Effect of procalcitonin-based guidelines vs standard guidelines on antibiotic use in lower respiratory tract infections: the ProHOSP randomized controlled trial.
CONTEXT: In previous smaller trials, a procalcitonin (PCT) algorithm reduced antibiotic use in patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). OBJECTIVE: To examine whether a PCT algorithm can reduce antibiotic exposure without increasing the risk for serious adverse outcomes. See Abstract at PubMed. Full text available free through PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Green tea and death from pneumonia in Japan: the Ohsaki cohort study.
BACKGROUND: Experimental and animal studies have shown the activities of catechins, the main constituents of green tea, against infectious agents. No data are available on the association between green tea consumption and the risk of pneumonia in humans. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between green tea consumption and death from pneumonia in humans. See Abstract at PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Seasonal invasive pneumococcal disease in children: role of preceding respiratory viral infection.
OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to demonstrate correlations between invasive pneumococcal disease in children and circulating respiratory viruses. METHODS: This retrospective study included 6 winter respiratory viral seasons (2001-2007) in Intermountain Healthcare, an integrated health system in the Intermountain West, including Primary Children's Medical Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. Children <18 years of age who were hospitalized with either invasive pneumococcal disease in any Intermountain Healthcare facility or culture-confirmed invasive pneumococcal disease at Primary Children's Medical Center were included. We analyzed the correlation between invasive pneumococcal disease and circulating respiratory viruses. Full text available free through PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.



Abstract: Outcomes of patients hospitalized with community-acquired, health care-associated, and hospital-acquired pneumonia.
BACKGROUND: Traditionally, pneumonia has been classified as either community- or hospital-acquired. Although only limited data are available, health care-associated pneumonia has been recently proposed as a new category of respiratory infection. "Health care-associated pneumonia" refers to pneumonia in patients who have recently been hospitalized, had hemodialysis, or received intravenous chemotherapy or reside in a nursing home or long-term care facility. See Abstract at PubMed.

Read more ...

Was this resource helpful to you?
0 of 0 people found this resource helpful.




Looking for a Top-Rated Primary Care Physician or Pulmonologist?
Consumers' Guide to Top Doctors finds the Doctors Rated Best by other Doctors
To find out who the top doctors are around the country, nonprofit Consumers' CHECKBOOK surveyed roughly 340,000 physicians to tell us which specialists they would want to care for a loved one. The Top Doctors database contains the names of over 23,000 doctors who were mentioned most often. Find top-rated doctors in the fifty largest metropolitan areas, in over thirty-five specialties, and more.
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Source: CDC

X-ray shows pneumonia in left lower lobe (bottom right)
Source: CDC

Consumers' Guide to Top Doctors finds the Doctors Rated Best by other Doctors in over 30 specialties.

Search Top Doctors database of 23,000 top-rated physicians by Doctor's Name

Search Top Doctors database of 23,000 top-rated physicians by Specialty (over 35 different fields included)

World Pneumonia Day
Source: Sabin Vaccine Institute

Consumers' Guide to Hospitals
Which Hospital Should You Choose
(or Avoid)?
"What makes the Consumers' Guide to Hospitals so special? We've got 30 million answers to that question. That's how many hospital records Consumers' CHECKBOOK sifted through to calculate risk-adjusted death rates and adverse-outcome rates, and that's just part of the data used to rate the hospitals. The organization also sent out more than 280,000 questionnaires to physicians in 53 major metropolitan areas in the United States, asking them to rate their local hospitals; checked ratings of the hospitals by surveyed consumers; checked which hospitals were providing recommended tests and procedures for patients with specified medical problems; and more."
AARP The Magazine
Find a Flu Shot Near You
Source: CDC/American Lung Association

Return to the Diseases & Treatments A-Z page

Please type in the letters below. We ask this to prevent automated programs and "bots" from rating resources.

CHECKBOOK Home      Privacy      Security      About      Contact Us         
Copyright 2014 Center for the Study of Services. All Rights Reserved.
CHECKBOOK is a trademark and service mark of the Center for the Study of Services and is registered with the US Patent and Trademark Office.