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Warts — Overview, Symptoms, Treatments, and Other Resources.
Warts (also known as Verruca)
Comprehensive Guides
Information on Warts from the National Institutes of Health
Warts are small, usually painless growths on the skin caused by an infection with human papilloma virus (HPV). The typical wart is a raised round or oval growth on the skin with a rough surface. Common warts tend to cause no discomfort unless they are in areas of repeated friction or pressure. Warts often go away on their own within two years. More at, U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health.

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Information on Warts from the American Academy of Family Physicians
Warts are a type of infection caused by viruses in the human papillomavirus (HPV) family. There are more than 100 types of HPV viruses. Warts can grow on all parts of your body. They can grow on your skin, on the inside of your mouth, on your genitals and on your rectal area. Common types of HPV tend to cause warts on the skin (such as the hands and fingers), while other HPV types tend to cause warts on the genitals and rectal area. Some people are more naturally resistant to the HPV viruses and don't seem to get warts as easily as other people. Read more at FamilyDoctor.org.

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Warts: Essentials
What is it? What are the symptoms? How common is it? What will happen? Key points about treatments at Consumer Reports.

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Fact Sheets, Tutorials, Interactive Tools, and other Interesting Information
Are there specific types of HPV related warts that are associated with cancer?
Some types of HPV are referred to as ‘low-risk’ viruses because they rarely cause lesions that develop into cancer. HPV types that are more likely to lead to the development of cancer are referred to as ‘high-risk.’ Both high-risk and low-risk types of HPV can cause the growth of abnormal cells, but only the high-risk types of HPV lead to cancer. It is important to note, however, that the great majority of high-risk HPV infections go away on their own and do not cause cancer. For more information, see National Cancer Institute and U.S. National Institutes of Health.

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Male Circumcision Reduces Risk of HPV Infection.
New research confirms substantial health benefits of male circumcision, including reduced acquisition of HIV, genital herpes, HPV and genital ulcer disease. The biological reasons why circumcision may reduce the risk of HSV-2 and HPV infection are not entirely known. HSV-2 and HPV multiply in epithelial cells found in the surface skin of the penis, and the foreskin may facilitate virus entry into those cells. Once circumcision has been performed, the risk of epithelial infection may be reduced. For more information, see U.S. National Institutes of Health.

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Videos and Podcasts
Podcast Podcast: Warts
In this Medically Speaking podcast, Dr. Anthony A. Gaspari, chief of dermatology at the University of Maryland Medical Center and professor and chairman of dermatology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, says warts are infections caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) virus. Liste at UMMC.

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Clinical Practice Guidelines
Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Immunization (Level II).
A new vaccine for HPV has been licensed for women. A three-dose series is recommended routinely for all females ages 11 to 12, and as early as age 9. Catch-up is worth doing up through age 26. While substantial numbers of older females have HPV infection, most have only one strain and will benefit from the vaccine. It is not necessary or desirable to test for previous HPV infection when starting the immunization series for sexually active women. More at National Guideline Clearinghouse.

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Important Articles from Medical Journals
Abstract: Warts are not merely blemishes on the skin.
Subjects who had a past history of warts were moderately to extremely embarrassed by them; concerned about negative appraisal by others for having them; and said that it difficult to play sport because of their warts. Warts have the potential to cause considerable morbidity at times; this should be taken into account when a patient asks for treatment. Abstract available at PubMed.

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Abstract: Sonography of plantar warts.
Sonography may be considered as reliable support for plantar wart diagnosis and may have a role in the evaluation of plantar wart treatment modalities, allowing monitoring of therapeutic responses, especially in recurrent and difficult cases with persistent symptoms such as pain. Abstract available at PubMed.

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Abstract: HPV treatment considerations.
Patient-applied HPV infection therapies offer patients the possibility of convenient and, on the whole, pain-free treatment. Podofilox and salicylic acid for genital warts, are the most cost-effective and appropriate first-line treatments. The second-line treatment of choice for common warts is cryotherapy. Alternative first and second-line treatments for genital warts would be either some form of surgical removal or imiquimod. It is hoped that protective and therapeutic HPV vaccines will transform the management of HPV in the future. Abstract available at PubMed.

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Abstract: Photodynamic treatment for viral infections of the skin.
There is evidence that Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be active against human papilloma virus (HPV), due to its anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative skills. The PDT application in this field is safe and successful; in comparison with the other techniques it has less side-effects and less recurrences, and it is not-invasive: it means a reduced risk of infections and excellent cosmetic results. Abstract available at PubMed.

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Abstract: Value of HPV Vaccination for Women.
Most cervical cancers are caused by HPV. In placebo-controlled trials, a vaccine against HPV (6, 11, 16, 18) almost completely prevented infections and associated clinical lesions in primarily not infected women. Furthermore, new data demonstrate that sexually active women, as well as those with prior infection, also benefit from the vaccine. These results suggest that a general vaccination program for sexually active women will be beneficial. Abstract available at PubMed.

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Consumers' Guide to Top Doctors finds the Doctors Rated Best by other Doctors
To find out who the top doctors are around the country, nonprofit Consumers' CHECKBOOK surveyed roughly 340,000 physicians to tell us which specialists they would want to care for a loved one. The Top Doctors database contains the names of over 23,000 doctors who were mentioned most often. Find top-rated doctors in the fifty largest metropolitan areas, in over thirty-five specialties, and more.
Electrosurgical Wart Removal

Common Plantar Wart Locations

Consumers' Guide to Top Doctors finds the Doctors Rated Best by other Doctors in over 30 specialties.

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Effectiveness of Freezing Warts
Source: Bandolier Journal

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